2022 – 2041 / Mobile devices’ future is Crystal Clear

Check out the previous post on this matter here2016 – 2021 / Mobile devices’ future is Crystal Clear

So (Smart) glasses are great but they still interfere with your image and personal lifestyle.

Apple is probably wondering why their smartwatch is not selling as much as they expected. They thought they could do with the watch what they did with the smartphone: world domination (or a 30% slice of it) – but perhaps the first question they should be asking is why do people still wear analog watches in the 21st century when their 1980s digital-quartz counterparts were far more accurate? Because a watch is far more than just “a watch” to those who (still) use it.

Back to transparent tech: the same thing could/will happen with smartglasses!

But how can you wear smartglasses and not wear glasses? That’s an easy one: contact lenses. Contact lenses that allow you to seamlessly access augmented reality and virtual reality environments. Basically, they seamlessly grant you total privacy in taking your first steps into larger worlds.

Ultimately, that’s where we’re headed.

 

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Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as a “Highly imaginative (…) action packed novel” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

RevolutionSF calls Future Man a “Thrilling adventure based on World War II history (…) made better by dialogue that really sounds like it comes from real people” adding that “The story takes place in present tense (…) It ratchets up the tension, as if it’s happening right now and you, the reader, are right there” concluding with “Future Man is a potent combo of history, science and adventure.”

Future Man is available now!

Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

Mankind | Are we an “advanced civilization”?

When considering countries or regions that benefit from peace and a stable political system, like the U.S, Europe, most of Asia, Australia, NZ … it would seem fair to see us and call us an advanced civilization. Even if, objectively, we don’t (yet) have another to compare it to. If you are reading this, chances are you are probably from one of these countries. In these, it’s reasonable to say people make a relatively comfortable living. There are a lot of things wrong with the world but, let’s face it, they hardly ever pass onto this side of the screen.

It helps to think that there were once services that only a century ago where exclusive to millionaires – which you can now afford – like travelling to distant locations. And most of us, with a little luck, will live to see their 90th anniversary when, a few centuries ago, you’d be nearly an elder at 50. Medicine has also reduced child mortality to virtually zero. Again, not a hundred years ago, families were large because they knew most younglings would not make it into adulthood. You can now get a smartphone relatively cheap that allows you nearly instant access to basically anything you need. You couldn’t get that a decade ago. And we went to the moon and all.

So, an advanced civilization we are.

But are we really? We’ve created a society so complex it takes us nearly 20 years in school to earn a decent place in it. Teaching methods and tools have improved but we still take the same 20 years as we did for decades. It’s a good thing we live to nearly a hundred now. Some people are lucky enough to make it big in life and make a lot of money. To these, life will bring on different challenges. But, to most of us, we have to work hard to pay our bills. We spend a significant part of what we earn in energy (home electricity, car gas …) and in the supermarket (food et al.). And, of course, then there are the mortgages (the roof over our heads), transportation, education and healthcare. All of these are, in a way, “basic needs”. Some are more basic than others, sure, but the truth is, for most people, there is very little left after you pay for the basic stuff.

Why? Because we’re NOT an advanced civilization. Not even a rational one, it seems.

What would an advanced, thinking, civilization do, before starting to put out, say, new smartphones, smart TVs and car models nearly every year? A thinking civilization, an advanced one, would try to take care of people’s basic needs with the least effort – or, in the world we live in, the least cost. This would – should – be its prime directive! Pretty obvious, right? Apparently not. By this I don’t mean to have the Government pay for everything. Quite the contrary, actually. I mean to put the trendy word “sustainability” to the test and try to make basic goods and services as cheap as they can be for everyone. Ideally, at no cost at all.

All the basic needs stated above – and some more that may feel basic to you – should represent like 5% (at most) of what you earn. Or less. You should have 95%, or more, to invest, create or do whatever pleases you. In an advanced civilization, basic needs shouldn’t “eat up” 95% of your earnings. How’s this possible in this day and age? Some may say the world is too divided for this but, frankly, I don’t think that’s it. Any medium-sized country could take the reins and do the right thing, start walking in the right direction. Is this rocket science? I don’t think so. Not yet.

Point of fact is: that’s what our great minds should be focusing on. Is there a doubt in your mind that if the people who are working on smartphones and smart TVs were to focus on, say, solar cells, you would have a solar panel the size of, say, a tablet – irony intended -, able to provide for free/clean energy for your car and perhaps even your home? And all this probably before the end of this decade? And, of course, in the long-term, this progress would release resources for much needed and not-immediately-profitable enterprises, such as expanding our world.

We need an “intelligent” civilization. Not (more) “smart” phones. We need Future Man.

Bruno De Marques.

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Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as a “Highly imaginative (…) action packed novel” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

RevolutionSF calls Future Man a “Thrilling adventure based on World War II history (…) made better by dialogue that really sounds like it comes from real people” adding that “The story takes place in present tense (…) It ratchets up the tension, as if it’s happening right now and you, the reader, are right there” concluding with “Future Man is a potent combo of history, science and adventure.”

Future Man is available now!

Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

 

Astronauts, pilots, dancers and princesses | Why not?

I could bet that, at some point in your life, you once dreamed of being a pilot, an astronaut or a ballet dancer. What about a princess? Am I wrong? At least, you’ve seen small children say it, without even being able to explain exactly why, right? If not, you should get on your feet and find a way out of that deserted island, pronto!

How many of these dreams survive our or theirs 12th anniversary? What about adulthood? Such small a percentage that, statistically speaking, it would probably be meaningless.

What do these “dream jobs” mean exactly? Surely there are hundreds of studies from people far more qualified than me, but here’s my two cents:

We are a daring people, born to be explorers. But not only that. We were also born to create and we’re particularly keen on beauty. What “beauty” means, of course, is different to each of us, coloring our wonderful diversity.

What if children’s dream jobs were unbiased interpretations of these primal drives?

As we grow up, our surroundings and the people we connect to condition us towards the practical aspects of life, such as putting a roof over our heads and the need to make enough money to pay the bills. With little room to breathe, our ambition rottens. Instead of driving us to dream and to personal accomplishment, it deceives us into thinking that “having more” is better than “being more”. As we grow older, those dreams start to look more and more foolish every time we manage to pause our daily grind and look back.

Is our mind actually maturing or is it slowly rotting?

It’s not your fault, though. It’s our society’s fault. But perhaps not as you may think: our society never allowed the future promised to us “to step forth”.

You see, if instead of one blue planet, Mankind were to be present in 100 planets, there would be opportunities and room for a lot more successful ballet dancers and astronauts. And other “fringe” jobs, as I like to call them. There would be enough resources and money to go around (if properly distributed … yeah, I know). Nobody would have to worry about making a living off fringe jobs.

All the new events we’d witness and be exposed to: there would be a lot to discover, a lot to inspire us into creating new things – not the endless reboot-remake-sequel-ridden era we seem to be living and see going on in pretty much everything.

Now let’s go wild: Our daughters want to be Princesses? Fine! If we were to be present in 100 worlds, we could have a new political system for these new planets where politicians would have a temporary royal status (remember the political system in Naboo, in Star Wars Episode I?). I’m not judging if royalty makes sense or not here. I’m just trying to make a point. That even the hardest thing we may conceive could be within our grasp.

You see, “space is boundless”. “The possibilities are endless”. And “The limit is (indeed) our imaginations”. The clichés are all true.

Our old world, on the other hand, as it stands today, is slowly collapsing onto itself. This reboot-remake-sequel-ridden era is just the beginning. Repressing our dreams and, with them, our primal drives could eventually drive us all mad. There’re already several events, apparently unrelated, that substantiate this (ex.: growing suicide rates among the young, hideous crimes in our schools, depression figures among young adults …)

Nothing was ever accomplished without someone having dreamed it first. But our dreams of late are having no consequence (except perhaps in the video-game market)

In space lies the answer.

And the realization of the dreams you no longer dare to dream.

Bruno De Marques.

Mankind | Can we get any less interesting?

If you’re anything like me, at least once you’ve wondered how it would be like to live in the Old West, be a Cowboy roaming the frontier, or perhaps a Knight in medieval times. But there’s no need to look so further back: some of us would settle for being a glamorous movie star in 1930s, a WWII hero in the 1940s or part of the American space program’s “Original Seven”, in the 1960s.

This is the result of hearing stories or reading or watching romanticized and “action-alized” versions of tales from those periods. We all know now that those were difficult times for most people. And the further back you look, the more difficult they were. Misery, disease and war. In short, most of these times would have actually been rather terrible to live in. And if you think of how uptight your grandfather probably feels/felt to you, just imagine how uptight his grand-grand-grand x 20 x grandfather from 500-years-ago would feel. Yeah. Chances are he wouldn’t laugh at any of your jokes. Maybe the ones with funny dismemberments.

But there was still, to some degree, truth to those stories – I mean there were once Cowboys roaming the frontier and Knights fighting just causes. And there were glamorous Hollywood stars in the 30s, WWII heroes in the 40s and brave astronauts in the 60s and 70s.

You’ve probably noticed that, apart from recent armed conflicts, fiction is failing to romanticize the following decades: the 1980s, the 1990s and the 2000s. Have you read or watched a movie that romanticized these times? If you did, it’s probably the exception. There aren’t a lot. Or, at least, not as much as there should be anyway, considering we’re talking about 4 decades ago already, wouldn’t you agree? Someone might say we’re still too close to those times for us to be able to “distanciate” ourselves from them and find the substance and charm to romanticize them. But that was never an issue in the past: you had “Back to the Future”(1985), that romanticized the 50s, only 30 years before it was produced. You had the “Right Stuff”(1983) that romanticized the American Space Program in the 60s – only 20 years before. And countless examples in literature.

So what’s wrong?  I don’t know for sure. I doubt anybody does. But I have a theory – again, my 2 cents on the matter. I believe we’re getting less and less interesting. That our times are getting less and less interesting.

There’s a Chinese saying that goes “May you live in interesting times.” I found out like 10 years ago that it was actually a curse and, by interesting, it actually means “troublesome times”. As in war and people-dying-for-no-reason kind of times. I was very disappointed. Before I knew what it actually meant, I liked it a lot more as it made a lot more sense to me than it does now. So indulge me in pretending it means what I first thought it meant: its literal meaning. So I may simply say that the last 40 years have not been “interesting times”.

And the fact that writers haven’t found the necessary substance in the 80s, the 90s or the 00s to romanticize these periods is (almost) undeniable proof of just that.

Just think: the most stressing global fact we’ve lived in the turn of the year 2000 was the “Millennium Bug.” Remember when we all thought computers would fail with turn of the millennium and that, by the next day, there’d be no record of your bank account or that you ever owned the house you live in? That bug. The actual issue was that the date-field in computers only had 2 spots instead of 4 and that meant it would go from “99” (1999) to “00” (2000) and, since these weren’t in sequence like before, nobody knew how computers would react. Now romanticize that! Not easy, huh? How exciting can you make it? How jealous will people feel in 50 years for not being here to live these days? This is the kind of crappy substance writers have had to work with for the last 40 years. No wonder so many turned to science fiction. Unless you spice it up with superheroes, vampires, aliens or time travelling robots from the future, there’s not a lot (with epic-story potential or cinematic “spectaculararity”) going on in the present. Or in the last 40 years for that matter. Nothing truly worth fantasizing over by future generations.

If you consider that the 80s where the times when remakes, reboots and sequels kicked into gear, along with the evolve-and-not-revolutionize wave – in just about everything – it’s not hard to see why there aren’t exciting subjects to write about.

Being a child of the 70s as I am, I thought this couldn’t get any worse. Turned out I was wrong. I wasn’t counting on how smartphones and tablets would take over our lives. And so we went down a few more steps in the “uninteresting-lives” scale. I’m sure you’ve seen evidence of this yourself. You enter a room, be it your living room or some party lounge, and you find everybody checking stuff out on their smartphones. You can tell something’s wrong with that picture but you soon ignore that feeling and join them. True?

Can we get any less interesting? Yes, apparently. Unless we do something about it.

But fear not: Future Man is here.

Bruno De Marques.

***

Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as a “Highly imaginative (…) action packed novel” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

RevolutionSF calls Future Man a “Thrilling adventure based on World War II history (…) made better by dialogue that really sounds like it comes from real people” adding that “The story takes place in present tense (…) It ratchets up the tension, as if it’s happening right now and you, the reader, are right there” concluding with “Future Man is a potent combo of history, science and adventure.”

Future Man is available now!

Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

5 Sci-Fi Movies/TV Series I’m Checking Out This Christmas

Here’s a small list of movies and TV series I’ve been curious about for some time now. They’re not what one would call “mainstream” so I thought of bringing them up here (spoiler free).

I’ve already watched “Ex Machina”, “Robot Overlords” and “The Flash” so, on these, I’ll be a bit more specific in my comments. I know very little about “Automata” and “Predestination” so I’ll just say what picked my curiosity.

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ex machina

Ex Machina

Great special effects. Lavish environments. Great acting.  I got that it’s-not-for-everyone vibe but, say, psychologists and psychiatrists will find it intriguing, especially Oscar Isaac’s tech-guru underlying motivation for his creations.

Totally watchable.

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Robot-Overlords-2014

Robot Overlords

Well, it’s British Sci-Fi so you get a little of that “B-movie” feel you get from “Dr. Who” and “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” and the likes but it’s every bit as imaginative. Lovely young actors. I’m sure we’ll be seeing more of them soon.

Totally watchable.

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The-Flash-key-art-16x9-1

The Flash

I had watched the first 5 episodes of “The Flash” and it felt like the beginning of “Smallville” all over again: repetitive to the point of getting boring. But with Smallville I quickly got to love the characters, namely Kristin Kreuk as Lana Lang and Michael Rosenbaum as Lex – and so I ended up watching the entire series and loving it.

That didn’t happen to me with “The Flash”. I had dropped it for good. But then I started watching and reading these amazing reviews about it. Most said it really picked up after episode 7 or 8 and it was one of the best superhero series on TV at present. Jeremy Jahns was one of the critics saying it and I usually see things eye-to-eye with him … so I began watching it again from episode 1.

Yep, it’s that good! If you’re a fan of other DC series like “The Arrow”, you should definitely watch it. If you can get through the first 7/8 episodes, you’ll be treated with one of the best superhero series on TV today.

A must-see for superhero fans. Totally watchable for Sci-Fi aficionados.

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 automata

Automata (Haven’t watched this one yet)

“Automata” has that expensive-looking filmography that immediately fills me with hope. Haven’t read or watched reviews about it yet but IMDB gives it a 6 so … I’m game.

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predestination2

Predestination (Haven’t watched this one yet)

Time travel is one of my favorite subjects. Hudson Hawke: great actor. IMDB is giving it a 7.4 (UAU! Just checked it.) so … Let’s go!

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What if someone was to call upon himself the task of making “the future”, as foreseen by classical Sci-Fi authors, happen in our lifetime?

Walk Vincent’s path in Future Man and learn how, thanks to him, everybody will have a chance at a different kind of life.

Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man, the movie-script-based novel, as “Highly imaginative” … “Action packed book” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

Available in Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Available in Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

The 7 Most Powerful Figures Shaping Our Future.

The Real “Future Man”

Regardless of the apparently exciting space-related news we come across every day in traditional and social media, the rather sad truth is:

For nearly 2 generations, transportation technologies have failed to take mankind any faster or further. It seems we’ve lost the thrill and desire to explore. Apollo 17 remains the MOST RECENT manned flight beyond Earth orbit. That was 1972.

It surely feels like we’re not doing enough.

But not every man has gone idle. There are seven.

Seven men who are working, shaping our future. These seven have moved beyond what riches can buy and are dedicating a large portion of what they have to give you a chance at a better future. A more fulfilling future.

What do these seven men have in common? They’re all, without exception, building spacecraft.

In no particular order:

 

In my opinion, these brave pioneers, they feel this in their bones. That Mankind is lacking. That it’s failing.

Some say they’re doing it for the money. Like they need it 😊. But they could be doing it to show – to prove – that it is viable to create a space-bound enterprise, be it tourism, mining or just carrying satellites to the space.

And that’s a good thing. No. A great thing!

There are no certainties as far as the future goes. Except for one: there’s no hiding from it.

***

What if someone was to call upon himself the task of making “the future”, as foreseen by classical Sci-Fi authors, happen in our lifetime?

Walk Vincent’s path in Future Man and learn how, thanks to him, everybody will have a chance at a different kind of life.

Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man, the movie-script-based novel, as “Highly imaginative” … “Action packed book” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

Available in Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Available in Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

5 Great Sci-Fi movies you may have missed

the-thirteenth-floor7

Thirteenth Floor (1999)

Synopsis: In late 1990’s Los Angeles, Hannon Fuller (Armin Mueller-Stahl) is the owner of a multi-billion dollar computer enterprise and the inventor of a newly completed virtual reality simulation (VR) of 1937 Los Angeles…

Why you may have missed it: The title screams “horror flick” but it’s nothing of the sort. It’s actually great, stylish, expensive looking sci-fi. It also sported some of the best scenic CGI of its day and its aging very well.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtYdZkPmFoU

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upside down

Upside Down (2012)

Synopsis: Adam is a seemingly ordinary guy in a very extraordinary universe. He lives humbly trying to make ends meet, but his romantic spirit holds on to the memory of a girl he loved once upon a time from another world, an inverted affluent world with its own gravity, directly above but beyond reach…

Why you may have missed it: Again, the title doesn’t do a lot for the movie unless you know what’s about. This is fantasy sci-fi, with some of the best visuals I’ve ever seen – and great acting by all involved.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtixqUXid9A

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strange days

Strange Days (1995)

Synopsis: A former cop turned street-hustler accidentally uncovers a police conspiracy in 1999 Los Angeles.

Why you may have missed it: By its movie poster, I don’t get a clue as to what it’s about. A “strange” movie that builds around a neurological gadget, with a superb cast and a riveting story, written by James Cameron.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yaXPx6xWEQ

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dk city

Dark City (1998)

Synopsis: A man struggles with memories of his past, including a wife he cannot remember, in a nightmarish world with no sun and run by beings with telekinetic powers who seek the souls of humans.

Why you may have missed it: Trailer looks a tad weird. Dystopian in nature, with several memorable settings and a surprising ending. A young(er) Jennifer Connolly in a charming role.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gt9HkO-cGGo

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moon

Moon (2009)

Synopsis: Astronaut Sam Bell has a quintessentially personal encounter toward the end of his three-year stint on the Moon, where he, working alongside his computer, GERTY, sends back to Earth parcels of a resource that has helped diminish our planet’s power problems.

Why you may have missed it: Its movie poster seems evocative of the 1970s but doesn’t do a lot for this great solo movie. One of the best actors of his generation, Sam Rockwell, stars in a character-driven story on the moon surface. Some of the best FX until “Gravity”.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=twuScTcDP_

Today is “Future Day”

October 21st, 2015. The future is today. Another important date has arrived, much like Kubrick’s “2001” and “2010” had and “Space 1999” before that. Soon it’ll be Blade Runner’s “2019” turn.

Back of the Future II has anticipated interesting things for 2015, some of them, in some way, are now a reality. But there’s two of them that would surely be interesting to have today but are nowhere to be found: flying cars and hoverboards. There are approximations, sure, but – for example – the anti-gravity-like tech, as it’s portrayed in the film, we never even came close to developing it.

bttf2-flying-cars[1]

But let’s be realistic: would “flying cars” have a place in our world? Probably not.

So who cares, right? Perhaps you should.

Please indulge me in a little parable of sorts. Let’s call it a honest attempt in showing you why we should all care.

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The young Mayan engineer and the wiser man of their times

There was once a young Mayan engineer who asked his elders: “Don’t you think we have enough pyramids? What about investing resources in exploring the huge mass of water that surrounds us? Shouldn’t we labor to find a way to navigate it and see what lies beyond it?”

The leading elder, the wiser man of their times, answered: “We’ve journeyed far enough. There’s nothing out there! Our resources will be put to better use in building a new pyramid, 10 feet higher than the last one.”

“Seriously? But it took us like a decade to build the last one!” The engineer said in dismay. “What will a pyramid that’s only 10 feet higher than the last one do for us?”

“It will bring us closer to the Gods!” The leading elder explained, raising his arms “We’ll be able to communicate with them a lot better!”

“But what if there’s another civilization out there, beyond the horizon?” The young engineer asked, “What if they come here and –“

“Silence!” the elder interrupted, “What evidence do you have of that?”

Unable to substantiate his claim, the young engineer gave up and returned to work.

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There’s no “hiding” from the future

The next day – or perhaps 500 years later – a small Mayan party, on their way to carry out their daily fishing duties, arrives at the beach and finds a huge unfamiliar object polluting a rather familiar setting. It looks like a boat but it’s nearly the size of a pyramid (a Spanish caravel / galleon). Soon they would find it carries people, not that different from them.

DPuylaG[1]

Once the hostilities began, the Mayans also found out that these strangely dressed folk (the Spanish “conquistadores”) also brought along an animal they could mount (the horse and the stirrup). On top of this beast and making use of nothing more than a lance, a single foreign warrior could take out 15 of their bravest. This in a single run.

A few years later, the Mayan civilization was no more.

This wasn’t an isolated event. Many civilizations disappeared, seen their people killed or enslaved during the so-called “Age of Discovery”.

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What “tipped the scale”?

It’s easy to think that it was weapons and military technology that were responsible for this. But was it? The Mayan example above hasn’t been chosen at random. The guns in the Spanish ships couldn’t reach the Mayan cities. It was extremely difficult to advance in the jungle, let alone carry military equipment, such as cannons. The bulk of the Spanish victories were achieved with half-equipped “knights” charging Mayan warriors with long lances.

So, what tipped the scale? Was it the weapons or was it the ability to cross the “ocean-sea” and, once on land, the use of the horse and stirrup? In my humble opinion, Transportation technologies tipped the scale. Without them, there would be no “Conquistadores” and no “Age of Discovery”.

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Back to the Future: 2015

So it’s 2015 and there are no flying cars. If you add the fact that the Concorde’s (the supersonic airliner) retirement in 2003 made it impossible for the common folk to cross the Atlantic in under 3 hours – and so, for the first time ever in transportation history, distances have become longer – plus the fact that Apollo 17 remains the most recent manned flight beyond low Earth orbit – That was 1972 … this leads to one conclusion: Transportation technology has not ceased to evolve but it’s not taking us any further or any faster.

ConcordeBarge-1103a[1]

History has showed us, more than once, just how important the development of transportation technologies can be in the long term survival of a civilization. And the extinction-level effects that may – will – arise from neglecting it.

Are we and everything we know at risk? What do you think?

Thank God, “Future Man” came along.

It’s not the novel. It’s the man. Meet Vincent De Marcos in “Future Man”.

Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions of “Future Man” are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

#BackToTheFuture

Future Man – A new novel explores the potential of the technological advances imagined in science fiction classics

Capa Hi res 1

Are we forfeiting the future?

A new novel from author Bruno de Marques explores the potential of the technological advances imagined in science fiction classics

What happened to the future? We live in 2015 and yet we have little to show for it – no flying cars, no humanoid robots, no manned space exploration. When did those dreams die?

Future Man, the new novel from author Bruno de Marques, seeks to revive that once-promising vision of the future. The tightly wound plot follows Vincent, an average, middle-aged man from Delaware, who is disillusioned by the unfulfilled promises of the science fiction of his youth.

Determined to usher in a new era of technological advances, Vincent searches the world for scientists who can help turn his vision to reality. What follows is an adventurous journey across the globe – and the Cosmos – as Vincent seeks to develop the technology that will create more interesting and fulfilling lives for people all over the world.

Source: excerpt from the novel’s US Press release

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Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as “Highly imaginative” … “Action packed book” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.”

“A tribute to classic Sci-Fi writers, their concepts and their expectations for the future.”

About Future Man

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Availability

Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

Link to Amazon US (Worldwide)

Link to Amazon UK (Europe)