Why is “Future Man” set in Delaware?

Delaware embodies three aspects from Future Man’s plot that are crucial:

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Inspirational enterprise: With its headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, DuPont is one of the largest chemical companies in the world. Its materials were critical to the success of the Apollo Space Program and, before that, also played a major role in the (atomic bomb’s) Manhattan Project in the 1940s.

DuPont businesses are presently organized into five categories: Electronic and Communication Technologies, Performance Materials, Coatings and Color Technologies, Safety and Protection, and Agriculture and Nutrition.

Vincent, the Delawarean protagonist in Future Man, gets his inspiration from DuPont when setting up The Consortium as a corporation, including the multi-category structure.


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All great things start small: In this case, in a small State: Delaware. Several sequences in the plot could only occur in a small – and proud – state.


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Growing together: As Vincent grows in the plot, so would his state/country, in the eyes of the world.

Delaware is a small state, sure, but with the potential for a tale like this to take place. After long consideration, Delaware was “cast for the role”.

If anywhere, Future Man could happen in Delaware.

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Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as a “Highly imaginative (…) action packed novel” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.”

RevolutionSF calls Future Man a “Thrilling adventure based on World War II history (…) made better by dialogue that really sounds like it comes from real people” adding that “The story takes place in present tense (…) It ratchets up the tension, as if it’s happening right now and you, the reader, are right there” concluding with “Future Man is a potent combo of history, science and adventure.”

Future Man is available now!

Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

Mankind | Are we an “advanced civilization”?

When considering countries or regions that benefit from peace and a stable political system, like the U.S, Europe, most of Asia, Australia, NZ … it would seem fair to see us and call us an advanced civilization. Even if, objectively, we don’t (yet) have another to compare it to. If you are reading this, chances are you are probably from one of these countries. In these, it’s reasonable to say people make a relatively comfortable living. There are a lot of things wrong with the world but, let’s face it, they hardly ever pass onto this side of the screen.

It helps to think that there were once services that only a century ago where exclusive to millionaires – which you can now afford – like travelling to distant locations. And most of us, with a little luck, will live to see their 90th anniversary when, a few centuries ago, you’d be nearly an elder at 50. Medicine has also reduced child mortality to virtually zero. Again, not a hundred years ago, families were large because they knew most younglings would not make it into adulthood. You can now get a smartphone relatively cheap that allows you nearly instant access to basically anything you need. You couldn’t get that a decade ago. And we went to the moon and all.

So, an advanced civilization we are.

But are we really? We’ve created a society so complex it takes us nearly 20 years in school to earn a decent place in it. Teaching methods and tools have improved but we still take the same 20 years as we did for decades. It’s a good thing we live to nearly a hundred now. Some people are lucky enough to make it big in life and make a lot of money. To these, life will bring on different challenges. But, to most of us, we have to work hard to pay our bills. We spend a significant part of what we earn in energy (home electricity, car gas …) and in the supermarket (food et al.). And, of course, then there are the mortgages (the roof over our heads), transportation, education and healthcare. All of these are, in a way, “basic needs”. Some are more basic than others, sure, but the truth is, for most people, there is very little left after you pay for the basic stuff.

Why? Because we’re NOT an advanced civilization. Not even a rational one, it seems.

What would an advanced, thinking, civilization do, before starting to put out, say, new smartphones, smart TVs and car models nearly every year? A thinking civilization, an advanced one, would try to take care of people’s basic needs with the least effort – or, in the world we live in, the least cost. This would – should – be its prime directive! Pretty obvious, right? Apparently not. By this I don’t mean to have the Government pay for everything. Quite the contrary, actually. I mean to put the trendy word “sustainability” to the test and try to make basic goods and services as cheap as they can be for everyone. Ideally, at no cost at all.

All the basic needs stated above – and some more that may feel basic to you – should represent like 5% (at most) of what you earn. Or less. You should have 95%, or more, to invest, create or do whatever pleases you. In an advanced civilization, basic needs shouldn’t “eat up” 95% of your earnings. How’s this possible in this day and age? Some may say the world is too divided for this but, frankly, I don’t think that’s it. Any medium-sized country could take the reins and do the right thing, start walking in the right direction. Is this rocket science? I don’t think so. Not yet.

Point of fact is: that’s what our great minds should be focusing on. Is there a doubt in your mind that if the people who are working on smartphones and smart TVs were to focus on, say, solar cells, you would have a solar panel the size of, say, a tablet – irony intended -, able to provide for free/clean energy for your car and perhaps even your home? And all this probably before the end of this decade? And, of course, in the long-term, this progress would release resources for much needed and not-immediately-profitable enterprises, such as expanding our world.

We need an “intelligent” civilization. Not (more) “smart” phones. We need Future Man.

Bruno De Marques.

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Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as a “Highly imaginative (…) action packed novel” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

RevolutionSF calls Future Man a “Thrilling adventure based on World War II history (…) made better by dialogue that really sounds like it comes from real people” adding that “The story takes place in present tense (…) It ratchets up the tension, as if it’s happening right now and you, the reader, are right there” concluding with “Future Man is a potent combo of history, science and adventure.”

Future Man is available now!

Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

 

The 7 Most Powerful Figures Shaping Our Future.

The Real “Future Man”

Regardless of the apparently exciting space-related news we come across every day in traditional and social media, the rather sad truth is:

For nearly 2 generations, transportation technologies have failed to take mankind any faster or further. It seems we’ve lost the thrill and desire to explore. Apollo 17 remains the MOST RECENT manned flight beyond Earth orbit. That was 1972.

It surely feels like we’re not doing enough.

But not every man has gone idle. There are seven.

Seven men who are working, shaping our future. These seven have moved beyond what riches can buy and are dedicating a large portion of what they have to give you a chance at a better future. A more fulfilling future.

What do these seven men have in common? They’re all, without exception, building spacecraft.

In no particular order:

 

In my opinion, these brave pioneers, they feel this in their bones. That Mankind is lacking. That it’s failing.

Some say they’re doing it for the money. Like they need it 😊. But they could be doing it to show – to prove – that it is viable to create a space-bound enterprise, be it tourism, mining or just carrying satellites to the space.

And that’s a good thing. No. A great thing!

There are no certainties as far as the future goes. Except for one: there’s no hiding from it.

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What if someone was to call upon himself the task of making “the future”, as foreseen by classical Sci-Fi authors, happen in our lifetime?

Walk Vincent’s path in Future Man and learn how, thanks to him, everybody will have a chance at a different kind of life.

Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man, the movie-script-based novel, as “Highly imaginative” … “Action packed book” … “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.

Available in Amazon US (Worldwide) http://www.amazon.com/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492225&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

Available in Amazon UK (Europe) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Future-Man-Bruno-Marques/dp/1480818143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1442492273&sr=8-1&keywords=future+man+bruno

 Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions are available in Amazon (all stores) | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

 

“If aliens visit us, the outcome could be much like when Columbus landed in America.” Stephen Hawking 25-09-2015

If aliens visit us, the outcome could be much like when Columbus landed in America, which didn’t turn out well for the Native Americans. Such advanced aliens would perhaps become nomads, looking to conquer and colonize whatever planets they can reach. To my mathematical brain, the numbers alone make thinking about aliens perfectly rational. The real challenge is to work out what aliens might actually be like.” Stephen Hawking 25-09-2015

Full article: http://elpais.com/elpais/2015/09/25/inenglish/1443171082_956639.html

That’s exactly what our previous post The Next Great World War advocates.

The future has finally arrived.

The wait is over. Future Man has arrived.

Kirkus Reviews describes Future Man as a “Highly imaginative” and “Action packed book”, adding “This wildly creative work certainly takes readers to many unexpected places.”

Get it from Amazon

Hardcover, softcover and e-book editions will be available in Amazon | Apple iBooks | Google | Barnes & Noble | Ingram | Baker & Taylor | Bowker | Kobo | Scribd

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In this adventure epic, with sci-fi archetypes at its center, Vincent De Marcos learns of the existence of a forgotten Jewish community composed of elite, scientific thinkers that have been hiding in Antarctica since World War II.

Disappointed at the reality of the “future”—the 21st century is nothing like classic sci-fi writers had foreseen—and fed up with the world around him, Vincent decides to go searching for the community despite the overwhelming odds.

If he finds it, he’ll have to decide whether or not the scientists can be trusted to help the world live up to its promise in “Future Man”.

“Will Vincent be able to successfully export such technology to the world at large or will such an attempt merely end in a disaster for him, as well as humanity?” (Kirkus Reviews)